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Awards Predictions Were a Lot Easier When I Actually Watched Movies (But Here Are Some Anyway)

Hubby and I are movie people. Going to movies almost every weekend and methodically working through the 300-plus titles on each of our Netflix queues were things we both did before we met. He even worked at a movie theater once. And a video store. One of the first gifts he gave me was the movie poster for Cinema Paradiso, a great movie about going to the movies. So yeah, our love of movies might as well have been written into our wedding vows.

Then, our daughter was born and, any parent of a small child reading this can probably guess what happened next. Movies became a rare treat, rather than the default plan for the weekend. How rare, you ask? A friend gave me a couple of gift cards for a chain of theaters two years ago and I still haven’t used them both up. (In fairness, I tend to forget I have them when we do make it to the theater—chalk that up to the sleep deprivation that also comes with being a parent.)

So this thing that once felt essential to my life, suddenly no longer did. It happens when someone else’s eating and pooping schedule rules your life. And yet, I don’t mind as much as I thought I would. A shift like that happens gradually, and you don’t really notice until you see a trailer for a film that your movie-loving psyche identifies immediately as MUST SEE and then months go by and you happen to see another commercial, this one for the DVD/Blu-ray, and you realize that not only did you not see the movie in the theater, you completely forgot it existed. And what’s more, it has been available on iTunes for weeks and maybe you’ll see it some night after the kid is in bed . . . or maybe you just won’t. Either way, life goes on, because whatever it was that I used to get from movies, I either need less of or I get someplace else. Either way, I have little time to think about it because the kid is a gray-hair inducing handful. Then, the kid smiles at you and gives you a hug, and in that moment, who cares about the movies, right?

Being all Zen about missing out on good movies does have an exception, of course, and that’s when awards season comes around. It’s then that I really wish I still had the time and inclination to see everything with the potential to be nominated. We try, but on a good year, we seen three, maybe four, of the dozen or so in contention for the big prizes, so when the award shows happen, I have no idea what will win and, what’s worse, no sense of indignation about what should have won at the end of it. I love talking about movies at Oscar time, but can’t muster up much to say with any kind of authority.

I know the movies I’ve seen (this year, that’s Boyhood, Gone Girl and not much else), I know what movies seem most enticing by the look of their trailers (Selma, The Theory of Everything) or by the look of their casts (The Imitation Game, Into the Woods). And I know what actors should win based on the number of snubs they’ve had to endure (Julianne Moore, ever and always) and what actors would give the best speeches (Bill Murray, ever and always).

So, based on absolutely nothing but my own uninformed biases and current whims, then, here are my Golden Globe predictions:

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

BOYHOOD
FOXCATCHER
THE IMITATION GAME
SELMA
THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Boyhood — Why? Because I’ve seen it, and it was actually really lovely, especially the journey of the character played by Patricia Arquette. Although I wouldn’t mind seeing The Imitation Game win just for the sake of watching the cast laugh as they watch Allen Leech run to the stage from the back of the ballroom, where the cast of Downton Abbey will, no doubt, be relegated to.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

JENNIFER ANISTON, CAKE
FELICITY JONES, THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING
JULIANNE MOORE, STILL ALICE
ROSAMUND PIKE, GONE GIRL
REESE WITHERSPOON, WILD

Julianne Moore because, seriously y’all, it’s her time. She is never not amazing.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

STEVE CARELL, FOXCATCHER
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, THE IMITATION GAME
JAKE GYLLENHAAL, NIGHTCRAWLER
DAVID OYELOWO, SELMA
EDDIE REDMAYNE, THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Playing a person with a disability is such an award show cliche, I don’t see anyone but Eddie Redmayne winning here. But maybe the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press are card-carrying Cumberbitches.

(Actually, I just wanted an excuse to say Cumberbitches. Eddie is going to take this one.)

BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

BIRDMAN
THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
INTO THE WOODS
PRIDE
ST. VINCENT

I saw St. Vincent, and it was a sweet, funny movie, but just short of award-winning, if you ask me. My money’s on Into the Woods. The HFPA likes its musicals.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

AMY ADAMS, BIG EYES
EMILY BLUNT, INTO THE WOODS
HELEN MIRREN, THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY
JULIANNE MOORE, MAPS TO THE STARS
QUVENZHANÉ WALLIS, ANNIE

Honestly, have no idea on this one so I’m just going to go with Quvenzhane Wallis because how fun would her speech be!

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

RALPH FIENNES, THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
MICHAEL KEATON, BIRDMAN
BILL MURRAY, ST. VINCENT
JOAQUIN PHOENIX, INHERENT VICE
CHRISTOPH WALTZ, BIG EYES

Bill Murray was awesome in St. Vincent, and he’d give a hell of a speech, but the buzz seems to be pointing to Michael Keaton, and I can’t be mad at that. Between Beetlejuice, Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing, The Paper and Ken in Toy Story 3, he’s earned it and then some.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

BIG HERO 6
THE BOOK OF LIFE
THE BOXTROLLS
HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2
THE LEGO MOVIE

I saw the Lego Movie, and it’s message was essentially this, “Fuck the instructions. Build what you want.” A-fucking-men. Everything is awesome, indeed.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

FORCE MAJEURE (SWEDEN)
GETT: THE TRIAL OF VIVIANE (ISRAEL)
IDA (POLAND/DENMARK)
LEVIATHAN (RUSSIA)
TANGERINES (ESTONIA)

When choosing in this category, always employ the Trivial Pursuit rule: pick the one you’ve heard of. That would be Ida.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

PATRICIA ARQUETTE, BOYHOOD
JESSICA CHASTAIN, A MOST VIOLENT YEAR
KEIRA KNIGHTLEY, THE IMITATION GAME
EMMA STONE, BIRDMAN
MERYL STREEP, INTO THE WOODS

I wonder. If Meryl Streep didn’t appear in any movies for a year, would people still nominate her for something? I love her, and she’s effortlessly talented, but her getting nominated has also become something of a cliche, wouldn’t you say? Not that it matters this year because Patricia Arquette deserves all the awards. Boyhood was hers as much as anyone else’s.

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

ROBERT DUVALL, THE JUDGE
ETHAN HAWKE, BOYHOOD
EDWARD NORTON, BIRDMAN
MARK RUFFALO, FOXCATCHER
J.K. SIMMONS, WHIPLASH

J.K. Simmons was one of my favorite parts of Up In The Air. Excited to see him get his.

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

WES ANDERSON, THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
AVA DUVERNAY, SELMA
DAVID FINCHER, GONE GIRL
ALEJANDRO GONZÁLEZ IÑÁRRITU, BIRDMAN
RICHARD LINKLATER, BOYHOOD

Wouldn’t it be awesome if Ava Duvernay won? But Linklater is taking all the awards, and I can’t say I mind. His “Before” series is one of my favorite things in the world.

BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

WES ANDERSON, THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
GILLIAN FLYNN, GONE GIRL
ALEJANDRO GONZÁLEZ IÑÁRRITU, NICOLÁS GIACOBONE, ALEXANDER DINELARIS, ARMANDO BO, BIRDMAN
RICHARD LINKLATER, BOYHOOD
GRAHAM MOORE, THE IMITATION GAME

Going to go with a wild card here and pick Gillian Flynn because I really enjoyed both versions of Gone Girl she wrote.

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

ALEXANDRE DESPLAT, THE IMITATION GAME
JÓHANN JÓHANNSSON, THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING
TRENT REZNOR, ATTICUS ROSS, GONE GIRL
ANTONIO SANCHEZ, BIRDMAN
HANS ZIMMER, INTERSTELLAR

I love Desplat scores and surely The Imitation Game is not going to get shut out of everything, right? Sure.

BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

“BIG EYES” — BIG EYES
Music by: Lana Del Rey and Daniel Heath
Lyrics by: Lana Del Rey and Daniel Heath

“GLORY” — SELMA
Music by: John Legend, Common
Lyrics by: John Legend, Common

“MERCY IS” — NOAH
Music by: Patti Smith, Lenny Kaye
Lyrics by: Patti Smith, Lenny Kaye

“OPPORTUNITY” — ANNIE
Music by: Greg Kurstin and Sia
Lyrics by: Sia and Will Gluck

“YELLOW FLICKER BEAT” — THE HUNGER GAMES:
MOCKINGJAY – PART 1
Music by: Joel Little, Lorde (Ella Yelich-O’Connor)
Lyrics by: Lorde (Ella Yelich-O’Connor)

Going with John Legend and Common just because I consider them the best musicians on this list, but Lorde is so hilariously awkward, her speech would be priceless.

Will return next week to see how I did . . .


One thought on “Awards Predictions Were a Lot Easier When I Actually Watched Movies (But Here Are Some Anyway)

  1. ME! (Sharon)

    11 Jan on 2015 at 8:49 am

    I agree with you about “Boyhood” winning; I haven’t seen it, but I do think a lot of people are just “amazed” at the patience it took in filming something 12 years in the making, so I could see it getting the award (plus Linkletter) for that alone. I do think that if the Globes didn’t divide the categories into two (comedy vs. drama) no question Michael Keaton would win all over. I haven’t seen Birdman either, but I do find myself wondering “how much of a ‘comedy’ is it?” I remember this happened with OITNB, being put into the comedy category, and while yes, there are plenty of funny moments, I would still call it a drama, but hey…studios want their films to win stuff! Anyway, long-winded way of me saying I’m not sure I see Eddie winning; while yes, playing people with disabilities seems to be “the thing” in landing awards, at the same time, because he’s “young”, I could see the HFP passing it up and thinking the nomination is an award for a talented young actor. And thinking back to when Jim Carrey won for both “The Truman Show” and the next year “Man on the Moon”, I could see Steve Carell taking the prize for playing a part that no one expected him to play. And I know the Globes would like to give Anderson something, so I find myself thinking that “Grand Budapest” winning the comedy category.

    I will end up missing the first hour of the Globes sadly! But “Awards season” is my super bowl so I am excited to see the kickoff tonight, even if it’s just one hour :oP

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